"Oh, for a nook and a story-book, With tales both new and old; For a jolly good book whereon to look Is better to me than gold."

Reblogged from asoiafuniversity  258 notes

Arya $tark

bowlingforweaselsoup:

People should talk more about how Arya is explicitly stated to be really good at managing finances.

•She’s incredibly good at math and running a household.
•She has seen the horrors wrought by a ruler who begggers the relm.
•She has no taste for the lavish and expensive events that drained away the capitals gold.
•She even speaks the language if the Iron Bank for Petesake.

I guess the point is that when Arya is queen, she won’t even need to appoint a master of coin.

Reblogged from randomminer  18,934 notes

mysharona1987:

A batch of wonderful book dedications.

and one of my favourite:

"My Dear Lucy,

I wrote this story for you, but when I began it I had not realized that girls grow quicker than books. As a result you are already too old for fairy tales, and by the time it is printed and bound you will be older still. But some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again. You can then take it down from some upper shelf, dust it, and tell me what you think of it. I shall probably be too deaf to hear, and too old to understand, a word you say, but I shall still be

your affectionate Godfather,
C.S. Lewis”
Reblogged from ohmypreciousgirl  853 notes
Please talk forever about Helen and ancient greek you are so enpoint

professorfangirl:

elucipher:

in the iliad helen speaks the last lament for hector. the only man in troy who showed her kindness is slain—and now, helen says, πάντες δέ με πεφρίκασιν, all men shudder at me. she doesn’t speak in the iliiad again.

homer isn’t cruel to helen; her story is cruel enough. in the conjectured era of the trojan war, women are mothers by twelve, grandmothers by twenty-four, and buried by thirty. the lineage of mycenaean families passes through daughters: royal women are kingmakers, and command a little power, but they are bartered like jewels (the iliad speaks again and again of helen and all her wealth). helen is the most beautiful woman in the world, golden with kharis, the seductive grace that arouses desire. she is coveted by men beyond all reason. after she is seized by paris and compelled by aphrodite to love him against her will—in other writings of the myth, she loves him freely—she is never out of danger.

the helen of the iliad is clever and powerful and capricious and kind and melancholy: full of fury toward paris and aphrodite, longing for sparta and its women, fear for her own life. she condemns herself before others can. in book vi, as war blazes and roars below them, helen tells hector, on us the gods have set an evil destiny: that we should be a singer’s theme for generations to come—as if she knows that, in the centuries after, men will rarely write of paris’ vanity and hubris and lust, his violation of the sacred guest-pact, his refusal to relent and avoid war with the achaeans. instead they’ll write and paint the beautiful, perfidious, ruinous woman whose hands are red with the blood of men, and call her not queen of sparta but helen of troy: a forced marriage to the city that desired and hated her. she is an eidolon made of want and rapture and dread and resentment.

homer doesn’t condemn helen—and in the odyssey she’s seen reconciled with menelaus. she’s worshipped in sparta as a symbol of sexual power for centuries, until the end of roman rule: pausanias writes that pilgrims come to see the remains of her birth-egg, hung from the roof of a temple in the spartan acropolis; spartan girls dance and sing songs praising one another’s beauty and strength as part of rites of passage, leading them from parthenos to nýmphē, virgin to bride. cults of helen appear across greece, italy, turkey—as far as palestine—celebrating her shining beauty; they sacrifice to her as if she were a goddess. much of this is quickly forgotten. 

every age finds new words to hate helen, but they are old ways of hating: deceiver and scandal and insatiate whore. she is euripides’ bitchwhore and hesiod’s kalon kakon (“beautiful evil”) and clement of alexandria’s adulterous beauty and whore and shakespeare’s strumpet and proctor’s trull and flurt of whoredom and schiller’s pricktease and levin’s adulterous witch. her lusts damned a golden world to die, they say. pandora’s box lies between a woman’s thighs. helen is a symbol of how men’s desire for women becomes the evidence by which women are condemned, abused, reviled.  

but no cage of words can hold her fast. she is elusive; she yields nothing. she has outlasted civilisations, and is beautiful still. before troy is ash and ruin she has already heard all the slander of the centuries; and at last she turns her face away—as if to say: i am not for you

holy fuck

Reblogged from misandry-mermaid  1,102 notes

Okay here’s a joke:

ask-an-mra-anything:

Two men walk into the hospital with two different injuries.

The first guy fell during a game of basketball and scraped his elbow. The doctor cleans out the gravel, disinfects the area, and places a little brown bandaid on the cut. The man thanks him, hops off the table, and goes back to shoot some more hoops.

The second guy has been in a car accident, and his arm is almost completely severed. The doctor cleans out the gravel, disinfects the area, and places a little brown bandaid on the cut.

The man looks down, screaming in pain. “I didn’t scrape my elbow!” He shouts. “What the hell are you doing, doc?”

"Well," the doctor replies. "I’m an egalitarian."

Reblogged from bookpatrol  66 notes

bookpatrol:

Digital Insurance: E-Book backup by Jesse England

Life in the cloud can have its consequences. Remember back in 2009 when Amazon unilaterally decided to remove copies of George Orwell’s 1984 and Animal Farm from customers Kindles due to a copyright issue. And what if we suffer a prolonged power outage? Or god forbid the Kindle becomes obsolete?

How will ever be able to access our ebooks?

Thanks to Jesse England and his E-Book Backup project we now have an insurance policy.

Says England of the project:

E-book backup is a physical, tangible, human readable copy of an electronically stored novel. The purchased contents of an e-book reader were easily photocopied and clip-bound to create a shelf-stable backup for the benefit of me, the book consumer. I can keep it on my bookshelf without worry of remote recall. A second hardcover backup has been made with the help of an online self-publishing house.

Oh, and England reminds us, “The backup is best viewed in paper format.”

E-Book backup : Jesse England.

Copying an eBook from Cover to Cover |  Hyperallgic

via ted striphas